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Parenting

The holidays are full of joy and excitement, especially for children. But each year, more than 300,000 children may end up in the emergency department (ED) for injuries caused by holiday decorations, toys, or burns from a fire.
Here are a few tips to make sure your kids continue to get sound sleep throughout the summer and get back into a routine once school starts.
Your toddler’s howling in the supermarket cookie aisle. Your teen told Aunt Betty she doesn’t like her birthday present. Your 10-year-old just let rip a swear word you didn’t even know he knew—in public. What now?
A healthy gastrointestinal (GI) tract is essential for helping kids thrive. But sometimes, this amazing system needs a little TLC. Whether you’re concerned about constipation, diarrhea, tummy aches, or just want to bolster your child’s digestive health to promote optimal overall health, these strategies can help.
Nighttime bed-wetting is common among young children. In most instances, the problem will go away even if parents do nothing, so patience and support are the key ingredients to waiting out this problem. But parents can take steps to make things easier.
You can take your child at a younger age, but experts recommend taking him or her by about 12 months at the latest. The dentist can provide or recommend preventative information regarding baby bottle tooth decay, infant feeding practices, mouth cleaning, teething, pacifier habits and finger-sucking habits.
With childhood obesity on the rise, should parents worry about the weight of their babies?
Do you want to gain better control over your asthma? Put it in writing!
You can help keep your children safe by following these precautions.
Quality time should be woven into our lives. As our children get older and slip away, we need to stop worrying about the extraordinary and think more about the ordinary."
Although some behavior problems can be attributed to normal child development, some need professional help.
Parents often jokingly describe themselves as chauffeurs for their children, and that’s not too far off—between baseball practices, dance lessons, and after-school tutoring sessions, the modern kid has many obligations. If it all feels like a little too much, it just might be.
The risk for head injuries in high school, college, and pro football players has received a lot of attention in recent years. But a recent study shows that hits to the head are an issue for younger players, too. And as kids grow older and bigger, the head impacts get stronger.
Kids can help assemble and measure the ingredients for this easy sweet treat that also packs a nutritional punch, thanks to the banana and avocado.
Putting babies to sleep on their backs has dramatically reduced the incidence of SIDS. One unexpected side effect: Many infants now have a flattened head.
Here's how to make your own baby food at home.
Even the best-prepared parents may be surprised by a few things that are quite normal in newborns.
You encourage your kids to brush and floss their teeth, take them in for regular checkups, and make sure they don’t eat too much sugar. But even if you practice great dental hygiene, emergencies affecting the teeth and mouth sometimes happen.
Bullying can happen in school, on the playground—and now even on the Internet through social networking sites. Here are some warning signs to watch for, and information on how to help your child.
Most youngsters learn the basics of pedaling, steering and braking on a tricycle or "big wheel" cycle, and around age 4 are ready to try a two-wheeler with training wheels.
No snow? No problem. You can still build a wintry friend using a leftover cardboard tube from toilet paper or paper towels.
A good guideline to follow is that a medical emergency is any time your child has an injury or illness you believe threatens his or her health or may cause permanent harm.
A child might say the worst part of being heavy is the teasing. You, too, probably dread the thought of your child being mocked or bullied. But the health effects of childhood obesity stretch years beyond the playground. That’s why it’s so important to catch weight problems early before they become a lifelong issue.
Here's a delicious breakfast dish kids can help make.
Any blow to the head can cause a concussion. Some of the symptoms may fade quickly, but others can linger. Your child may have trouble sleeping or thinking.
A common ingredient in many cough and cold remedies has become a popular substance to abuse by teenagers searching for a cheap, easy high.
Cyberbullying, like its old-fashioned counterpart, feeds anxiety and depression. Here's how to cool it.
Here are some guidelines on a few of childhood’s most common anxiety disorders. Learn how to help your young one through minor worries—and how to spot signs that more help may be needed:
Many experts urge hearing tests before newborns leave the hospital. Every year, several thousand babies with hearing problems are born in the U.S.
About 60 percent of newborn babies develop jaundice, but managing it is important because it can cause long-term health problems in rare cases. Here’s what you should know about this common and usually mild condition.
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